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The Number 7 subway extension connects the new Hudson Yards neighborhood on Manhattan’s far west side with transportation hubs at Times Square and Grand Central Station. The first addition to the city subway system in over 25 years, the design incorporates 21st Century levels of safety, comfort, and convenience. A technically complex project, the new line threads itself below the Lincoln Tunnel, Penn Station rail yards, and other subterranean infrastructure. Thousands of daily riders are whisked to the surface on escalators or inclined elevators from one of the deepest rail platforms in New York.

The Number 7 subway extension connects the new Hudson Yards neighborhood on Manhattan’s far west side with transportation hubs at Times Square and Grand Central Station. The first addition to the city subway system in over 25 years, the design incorporates 21st Century levels of safety, comfort, and convenience. A technically complex project, the new line threads itself below the Lincoln Tunnel, Penn Station rail yards, and other subterranean infrastructure. Thousands of daily riders are whisked to the surface on escalators or inclined elevators from one of the deepest rail platforms in New York.

"The completion of the 7 train extension marks a great step forward in modernizing our city’s subways for the 21st Century."
— Former City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito

This major infrastructure upgrade was the catalyst for the development of new commercial, cultural, and residential construction in a once industrial neighborhood, and exemplifies how modern transit facilities can be functional, beautiful, and integrated into the fabric of the communities they serve.

This major infrastructure upgrade was the catalyst for the development of new commercial, cultural, and residential construction in a once industrial neighborhood, and exemplifies how modern transit facilities can be functional, beautiful, and integrated into the fabric of the communities they serve.

Glass canopied station entrances are integrated into Hudson Park, adding a focus to this new public open space that serves Hudson Yards, Javits Center, and the High Line.

The Station’s Main Entrance leads to the Upper Mezzanine fare zone and is graced with public art and abundant natural light.

A Secondary Entrance accommodates the anticipated continued growth of passenger flows as Hudson Yards gets built out. Throughout the Station, material choices and color palettes capitalize on indirect lighting to produce glowing architectural form.

Glass canopied station entrances are integrated into Hudson Park, adding a focus to this new public open space that serves Hudson Yards, Javits Center, and the High Line.

The Station’s Main Entrance leads to the Upper Mezzanine fare zone and is graced with public art and abundant natural light.

A Secondary Entrance accommodates the anticipated continued growth of passenger flows as Hudson Yards gets built out. Throughout the Station, material choices and color palettes capitalize on indirect lighting to produce glowing architectural form.

Accessibility, safety, security, and universal design informs passenger circulation. The transit system’s first glass-enclosed inclined elevators allow all riders to travel the same path from the mezzanine to the platform. The lower mezzanine and platform are both wide and column free.

Accessibility, safety, security, and universal design informs passenger circulation. The transit system’s first glass-enclosed inclined elevators allow all riders to travel the same path from the mezzanine to the platform. The lower mezzanine and platform are both wide and column free.

The station’s design offers subtle cues to keep circulation flowing through the intermediate space of the column-free lower mezzanine. Acting as an arrow, large porcelain tiles were cut vertically and horizontally to create longer horizontal rectangles that line the mezzanine. High ceilings over stair landings draw visitors upward. The station’s walls and mezzanine ceiling are made of removable panels—helping to aid in maintenance over time.

The station’s design offers subtle cues to keep circulation flowing through the intermediate space of the column-free lower mezzanine. Acting as an arrow, large porcelain tiles were cut vertically and horizontally to create longer horizontal rectangles that line the mezzanine. High ceilings over stair landings draw visitors upward. The station’s walls and mezzanine ceiling are made of removable panels—helping to aid in maintenance over time.

"This extension instantly creates an accessible new neighborhood right here in Manhattan … it is anchoring the transit-oriented, mixed-use development transforming the far West Side."
— Thomas Prendergast, Former MTA Chairman
Gateway to Manhattan’s Far West Side
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The project extends the Number 7 Subway line from its original terminus at Times Square, running along 41st Street and then south along Eleventh Avenue to 34th Street.
The project extends the Number 7 Subway line from its original terminus at Times Square, running along 41st Street and then south along Eleventh Avenue to 34th Street.
The project extends the Number 7 Subway line from its original terminus at Times Square, running along 41st Street and then south along Eleventh Avenue to 34th Street.
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The new 34 Street-Hudson Yards Station encompasses two new entrances within a new public plaza as well as four supporting systems buildings for ventilation.
The new 34 Street-Hudson Yards Station encompasses two new entrances within a new public plaza as well as four supporting systems buildings for ventilation.
The new 34 Street-Hudson Yards Station encompasses two new entrances within a new public plaza as well as four supporting systems buildings for ventilation.
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3
The Platform level of this station is 125 feet below the street (due to the adjacent Lincoln Tunnel). Five escalators and two inclined elevators carry patrons to the lower mezzanine within the deep, mined station cavern.
The Platform level of this station is 125 feet below the street (due to the adjacent Lincoln Tunnel). Five escalators and two inclined elevators carry patrons to the lower mezzanine within the deep, mined station cavern.
The Platform level of this station is 125 feet below the street (due to the adjacent Lincoln Tunnel). Five escalators and two inclined elevators carry patrons to the lower mezzanine within the deep, mined station cavern.
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4
One of New York City’s deepest stations, the architectural and structural design are integrated within deep station cavern construction.
One of New York City’s deepest stations, the architectural and structural design are integrated within deep station cavern construction.
One of New York City’s deepest stations, the architectural and structural design are integrated within deep station cavern construction.
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The station was designed to serve 35,000 riders during peak hours, making it possible for thousands of residents, employees, and visitors to get to and from Hudson Yards easily and quickly.
The station was designed to serve 35,000 riders during peak hours, making it possible for thousands of residents, employees, and visitors to get to and from Hudson Yards easily and quickly.
The station was designed to serve 35,000 riders during peak hours, making it possible for thousands of residents, employees, and visitors to get to and from Hudson Yards easily and quickly.
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Location
New York, NY
Area
364,000 sf
Completion
2015
Clients
MTA Capital Construction
Collaborators
WSP
Toshiko Mori Architect
Xenobia Bailey
Categories
Recognition
AIA NY + ASLA NY—Transportation + Infrastructure Merit Award, Structures
AIA NYS—Design Award, Infrastructure
AIA NYS—Excelsior Award
ACEC National—Grand Award for Excellence
ACEC NY—Diamond Award for Excellence
ACEC NY—Empire Award for Excellence
ENR National—Best of the Best Award, Airport/Transit
ENR New York—New York Best Project, Airport/Transit
Global Infrastructure Forum—Engineering Project of the Year
SARA National—Design Award for Excellence
Urban Land Institute NY—Excellence in Civic Space Award
View Project Facts
Location
New York, NY
Area
364,000 sf
Completion
2015
Clients
MTA Capital Construction
Collaborators
WSP
Toshiko Mori Architect
Xenobia Bailey
Categories
Recognition
AIA NY + ASLA NY—Transportation + Infrastructure Merit Award, Structures
AIA NYS—Design Award, Infrastructure
AIA NYS—Excelsior Award
ACEC National—Grand Award for Excellence
ACEC NY—Diamond Award for Excellence
ACEC NY—Empire Award for Excellence
ENR National—Best of the Best Award, Airport/Transit
ENR New York—New York Best Project, Airport/Transit
Global Infrastructure Forum—Engineering Project of the Year
SARA National—Design Award for Excellence
Urban Land Institute NY—Excellence in Civic Space Award
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